AIL-Altig

Altig Orlovic Agencies with American Income Life

Phil’s Leadership Memo 9/24/13

Phil_bio_pageYour time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.   –Steve Jobs  1955-2011

Alright.   Admit it.   You yelled at the TV this weekend.   Whether you were watching college football or the NFL.  There were numb-skulled plays, offensive linemen that just let the pass rush right by them, a quarterback that missed the WIDE OPEN receiver, the running back that didn’t tuck the ball away and lost it to the other team.   Everyone in the stadium yelled; the people back home had a front row seat and yelled even louder.  And the funny thing; about 80% of the people yelling probably never played competitive football past the 8th grade.  But now they are experts on what the professional SHOULD have done.  He should have cut right; he should have thrown up top, he should have gone for the ball instead of hitting the receiver.

Why do we yell at the TV?  Or the player on field.   There isn’t a chance he is going to hear you.   We yell because to us, the player is doing something REALLY STUPID that going to hurt his team, maybe even cost the game.   For one, I guess it makes us feel better.    I suppose it’s better than yelling at the dog or kicking the cat.   Well, I guess you can kick the cat.  I’m a dog guy.   But I think the bigger reason is:  When see someone doing something so dumb, so ridiculous, that it’s going to hurt them and the whole team, it makes you want to scream.

It’s much easier to see mistakes other people make.   Especially in HD, 60 inch, super s..l..o..w-motion – rewinded 6X, from 4 different angles.   And from there, it is obvious what the other person should have done.   The player is just reacting – in real time – with bodies flying all around him.

And so when I saw the AOktober Safari contest that started this week.   I yelled.  “Gooooo.”    There’s about $15,000 or $20,000 in very cool prizes.   Most of it is cash, so you can buy yourself WHATEVER PRIZE you want.    So that is obvious reason #1.   You still get the advances, bonuses, renewals, but now you have even MORE incentive to hop on it.  Maybe the most incentive that you’ve had all year.    REASON #2.  It’s a SAFARI.  Make it a blast, learn a lot, accelerate your learning curve, see tons of clients somewhere new.  The closing ratio is generally outstanding, especially if you’re hitting small towns, because people don’t get out there as often.   It’s an investment into the place with the best return of all: YOU.  Safaris are where people write $5,000, $7,000, $9,000 in a week.   Do you think Alan Sedaghat sat in his home city when he wrote $500,000 last year?  Not a chance; it was one loooong safari.  He knows that is where you really make it happen.  It costs money to travel?   Write a couple extra deals for $1,000, and you’ve got $1,000 cash.  You are a business man or woman now, beginning changing your thinking into one.   Split a hotel if you have to, we’ve had new guys camp it.  Whatever you do, don’t miss out.   From your perspective now, it might not be worth it.  You might think it’s a better move to stay home.  I can assure you that is a terrible mistake.  And as the guy who is watching this play unfold, I’m going to yell, because I don’t want you to make a devastating play.   Hit the road this month.

Finally.  It is your BIG opportunity to make a statement.  Your name will be on AltigTV, in lights.   You have made your entrance into the world of high achievers.  Win because you are a competitive guy or gal, you can’t stand losing, and you don’t want to make a dumb move and have thousands of fans yelling at you.  Okay, maybe not thousands, but we are your biggest fan.  Go out there and make it happen for AOKTOBERFEST.

We’re reviewing executive messages from the last conference.   Right now, it’s Ilija’s 10 points for creating exceptional cultureFourth Point:  Monday, the first day of training in the office.   That Monday, you have to teach your people the factors that are in their control.   You need to teach them how to work smart; how to make money; and how to be successful.   That is what they expect.   And you as the MGA have already done that.   You need to teach them.

Personally, I (Ilija speaking) would never delegate Monday training.   Don’t give that to anybody; because you are the best at that.   By delegating that out to someone who is not as good as you, you are sending a message, and culture is the sum of all messages you send.   You need to personally handle the most important parts of your business.    And Monday training is one of those.

#5.  Rule for building culture.   At all times, the most important thing you have is honesty, integrity and trust.   You must be truthful with your people in order for them to trust you.   You can’t cover up.   You can only have trust when:

  1. 1.    When someone has concern for you.
  2. 2.    When there is competence.
  3. 3.    When there is integrity.
  4. 4.    When there is a shared common objective.

We are taught to lie since childhood.  Don’t and don’t accept it.  If you have trust, four things happen:

  1. You reduce stress.
  2. It improves communication.
  3. Reduce the wasting of time.
  4. Improves cooperation.
  5. Increases the ability to handle change.

Each one of those 5 deserves its own page.  And from working with Ilija 17 years, I can personally tell you that he lives down this value.  Even if you might not like what he tells you, you can know that it is honest and trustworthy.   He will always give it to you straight.  I’ve never seen it any other way.   And that goes a long, long, long way, not only in business, but in all of life.

$733,000 in TOTAL ALP this week.  That’s new policy sales, just in the last week.  Very good.  Now when we start hitting million dollar weeks you’ll see me start to really go berserk.

#1 Office.    Based on First Six Month Agent ALP.

Washington.   $53,845.    Here’s what I love.  Their tenured agents wrote $1,037 per sale.  Their NEW agents, wrote $1,171.   The first number’s good.  The second one even better.  Always hire people that are better than you, whenever the opportunity arises.    And train them to be better than you.  They wrote $135,700 total.  $2,561 per agent.   What happened?   Activity is up 25% from 6 months ago and so sales are up more than that.   This is Operation Field starting to gain some traction.  Redmond with Nick Lorence led everyone with $34,500.  Vancouver and Renton each topped $20K while Lynwood and Tacoma were both over $15,000.

#2.  Utah.  $42,000.   They AVERAGED $3,036 per agent.   Again.  Activity.  They’re averaging between 14 and 15 presentations with their full-time producers hitting right at 20.  Patrick Rieger, with $36,300 in total ALP is starting to pour it on.

#3.  Tennessee. $34,273.   They are selling more referrals than any other kind of lead.   $76,000 in total ALP, so about 50% new, 50% tenured.  Almost perfect.   Memphis West, led by Bei-Cherri Xie topped the state.   $4,926 production per agent.  A sizzling 48% closing ratio.

#4.  California.  $32,735.   $68,500 in total ALP, so another good agent mix.  $2,446 per agent.  Josh Olin led Huntington Beach.  $3,100 over 6 agents, or $18,700 total.   Tip of the hat to Spencer Rowland.  He’s got Chico rocking, with $9,000 this week.

#5.  British Columbia.  $22,248.  This is a 2 office show right now.  Surry and Burnaby.  $17,000 and $16,000 respectively.    Bob Gujral’s on fire.

#6.   Minnesota.  $20,639.   Stenglein and Stenglein.  They contributed $28,000 to the total.  Another office with $2,400 in ALP per agent.  More than $1,000 a sale; over 25% close.  Great job.

Honorable Mention.  Hawaii.  $19,106.

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This entry was posted on September 24, 2013 by in Phil Folkertsma.
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