AIL-Altig

Altig Orlovic Agencies with American Income Life

Phil’s Memo 1/31/13

Phil_bio_pageWhen Super Bowl time comes around, I get jealous.    –Bill Parcells (two Super Bowl rings)                                                                                             

It’s Super Bowl Sunday, XLVII or 42 for you non-Romans in the crowd. The first Super Bowl was held 42 years ago. There is no complete video footage of the game. In 2011, they found the most complete recording of the game in someone’s attic. It’s only missing the half time show and most of the third quarter. Only 61,000 of the 94,000 seats at the Los Angeles Coliseum were sold. Tickets costs $12. Half time entertainment was a trumpet player and the esteemed University of Arizona marching band. Packer players made $15,000 for being a part of the winning team; the losing team, the Kansas City Chiefs got $7,500.

What a difference 42 years makes. The game is watched by billions. The cheapest ticket on the market right now is $1,500, and that’s in the corner end zone, way up. The average ticket on TiqIQ today was $3,025.  Advertising is running $3.8 million for a 60 second spot. Last year, the winning players each got $48,000 and the losing teams got $29,000 each.  And no. There are no unsold tickets.

Let’s review that a bit. First of all, last month, five American Income Life RGA’s and MGA’s got a bigger bonus than the guys who played in the Super Bowl. And they’re getting that monthly, not once a year, IF they make the Super Bowl. That oughta give you a little more hope if you weren’t born 6’4, 260 pounds and can’t run a 4.5 in the 40.

Here’s another insight. The guys at Super Bowl I thought they had arrived. The crowd, being on TV, and a $15,000 bonus. Wow. And the guys in Super Bowl 42 feel they are at the pinnacle. They’re both right. We’ll look back in 42 years (if we’re still here) and it will probably look COMPLETELY different again. Will it be the Hong Kong Kamikaze’s against the Paris Pandora’s.  Kickoffs and punt returns eliminated; high tech helmet shields where the quarterback can track his receivers on a tiny screen on the inside of his shield. I don’t know. Nobody does.

So we are currently in the best of times; BUT even better times are ahead. It is a paradox. I look at what we have today: Laptops and Smartphones. Child Safe and GPS.  RMS and support at your fingertips. But the lesson is to keep on pressing forward. Time stands still for no man. Keep improving, keep getting better. Life is rarely made up of giant leaps but incremental improvements and growth. Even 10 years ago, I couldn’t have imagined an ABC with hundreds celebrating in Vegas. Have an eye on the goal while living in the present.

And that’s how you get to the Super Bowl in the first place. 32 teams all start out with the exact same goal. But it was the team that won each game, one at a time, that now sits at the top. Envision what you want your agency to look like, but take that next step today in getting there. A part of the difficulty in motivation is that usually the action and reward are separated by quite a bit of distance.   If you could work out for a whole day and lose 20 pounds, wouldn’t you do it? But an hour every day for 60 days for some reason seems a bit more daunting. The connection between you taking an agent out into the field tonight and his or her becoming the next incredible RGA or MGA is not closely connected in your mind.  But that’s how every great leader we have at this company started.

One right decision, one amped up recruiting class, one focused sales meeting can change the direction of your business.  It might take a year or two to ripen, but that’s how every great organization starts.

And you have some distinct advantages over the Super Bowl Teams. They are limited on how they get their players. They can only wait in line and draft college kids, or get into bidding wars for free agents. Or maybe trade one of their current team members. You can recruit and hire wherever, whenever, whoever you want. There’s no limit on the number of players on your team; there’s no salary cap. There’s no shortened window that make you old at 30. You can grow your deal as big as you want. Rick Altig and Ilija Orlovic were sitting in the exact same chair and office you now sit in.  It was as small as Super Bowl I. But they had a vision of something way bigger, and they were willing to put the time and effort it took to get there. Are you going to the Super Bowl or gonna watch it from the couch? You get to pick.

Quick peek into ABC. Dan Toshner is now at the mike. He started right out of college. His cousin’s best friend was Josh Olin and Josh had recently moved from investment banking and within a few short years had a highly successful RGA-ship at Altig. They were both University of Washington alumni and soon what started as a small Olin Agency was spreading across the country.

Dan repeated a couple themes from the week. On is that “You have to fail to be successful.” How true. What do you call the guy who gets out 2 of every 3 times he goes to bat? Yes, the best hitter in professional baseball. You only lose when you quit going to the plate.

He spoke about his rivalries with Alan Sedaghat and others that pushed him to be better than he would have been, just on your own.  Dan is a competitive guy.  Find your hot button and what pushes you to succeed. He’s not superman. He’s just a focused, driven guy that knows what he want out of life and is willing to pay the price.

We’ve got six territories now at or over standard.  What is standard?  Glad you asked.  $20,000 in New Agent Production. We count agents as “New” through their First Six Months. How do you grow your Total agent production? Hire New agents. Nobody can make it to one year with the company until they first pass 6 months and they can’t pass six months unless they’ve been here 1 month. Almost seems too simple, but many things in life are. We just try complicate it.

#1. By $400…. The State of Washington. $27,658. They just out-sat everybody. What do I mean by that?  They had more “sits”, more presentations than any other state or province. Over $104,000 in TOTAL ALP for the week. 30% closing ratio overall, $973 ALP per sale. Solid as ever. Redmond wrote $52,000 and Lynnwood $36,000, so those two offices are leading the way.

#2.   Less than a sale behind: Nevada. $27,230.  Actually, a little over half of this state’s production is off of newer agents. Las Vegas Central, $13,500, Las Vegas, $13,300 and Reno, $11,400, so all three offices are neck and neck. Even with a newer state, they are closing one out of four.  Whichever office moves their total activity numbers up will start to pull away.

Third place. Also growing every week. Utah.  $25,197. Their new agents are averaging $1,096 in ALP per sale. How do you get $1,100 in ALP per sale? Aim for $2,000. It’s like anything. You need to aim higher than you really want because “stuff” is going to happen. This is a family memo so I can’t use the other word but you know what I’m talking about. One guy’s affordability factor is $700.  So you have to find someone else at $1,500 to average $1,100.  Aim higher than where you want to come in.

#4.  Alberta. $20,197. A strong referral and POS province. Calgary is taking off. While we’re measuring new agent production, none of that happens without the experienced, successful leader leading the way and that’s what Melinda Rae Lyse and John McGrath bring to the table. They are the engine that is making this province roar.

#5.   Hawaii. $20,810. If Hawaii takes home anymore hardware from ABC, we might have to start going to Honolulu instead of them coming to the mainland. They wrote $88,000 overall, which shows the strength of their tenured sales force. Maui wrote $22,800 to lead everybody. Honolulu, $15,000. Hilo on the Big Island, $13,000, Waipahu and Ualena $11,000 and Kaneohe with $9K.

Honorable mention. Virginia at $19,849. Their new agents sold 16 deals off of referrals, so they are being trained correctly. That number was tops in the company.

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This entry was posted on January 31, 2013 by in Ilija Orlovic, Phil Folkertsma.
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